666 Challenge

I am not sure where this challenge originated in, but I found it on BookCrossing 666 Challenge.

Here are the rules:

You aim to read 6 books which are set in OR are written by an author from 6 different countries in each of the 6 continents within 2017.  You cannot count books of the same country twice and you cannot count one book for more than one country.

This sounds fun, and as I enjoy reading books from different parts of the world, this challenge is manageable, nudging me a slightly beyond my comfort zone.

AFRICA:

KENYA – Facing the Lion by Joseph Lemasolai Lekuton
ALGERIA – The Attack by Yasmina Khadra (story set in Israel but author from Algeria)
TOGO – An African in Greenland by Tete-Michel Kpomassie
IVORY COAST – Aya of Yop City by Marguerite Abouet and Clément Oubrerie
EGYPT – Zaatar Days, Henna Nights by Maliha Masood

EUROPE:

ITALY – Silk by Alessandro Baricco
U.K. – Case Histories by Kate Atkinson
GREECE – The Summer of My Greek Taverna by Tom Stone
FRANCE – The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George
SWITZERLAND – Blue Pills by Frederik Peeters
SWEDEN – The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson

ASIA:

INDIA – The Empire of Tea by Alan MacFarlane & Iris MacFarlane
ISRAEL – Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari
JAPAN – With the Light by Keiko Tobe
NEPAL – Peak by Roland Smith
CHINA – From Point to Point by Xu Bing
VIETNAM – Silence by Thich Nhat Hanh

NORTH AMERICA (INCL. CENTRAL AMERICA & THE CARIBBEAN):

USA – Still Alice by Lisa Genova
CANADA – Paddle to the Arctic by Don Starkell
MEXICO –  The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz
ANTIGUA – Lucy by Jamaica Kincaid

PACIFICA (INCL. ANTARCTICA):

PAPUA NEW GUINEA – Islands in the Clouds by Isabella Tree

SOUTH AMERICA:

ARGENTINA – The Aleph by Jorge Luis Borges
VENEZUELA – Indulgence: One Man’s Selfless Search for the Best Chocolate in the World by Paul Richardson
CHILE – Zorro by Isabel Allende
COLOMBIA – One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

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Published in: on June 4, 2017 at 6:08 pm  Leave a Comment  

Book Riot’s 2017 Read Harder Challenge

  1. Read a book about sports – Gothic Sports vol 1-2
  2. Read a debut novel – The Girl Who Fell from the Sky
  3. Read a book about books – The First Among Sequels
  4. Read a book set in Central or South America, written by a Central or South American author.One Hundred Years of Solitude
  5. Read a book by an immigrant or with a central immigration narrative. – Goodbye, Vietnam
  6. Read an all-ages comic – Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier
  7. Read a book published between 1900 and 1950 – Bread Givers
  8. Read a travel memoir – Paddle to the Arctic
  9. Read a book you’ve read before – Something Rotten
  10. Read a book that is set within 100 miles of your location – How Sweet It Is!
  11. Read a book that is set more than 5000 miles from your location – The Summer of My Greek Taverna
  12. Read a fantasy novel – City of Lost Souls
  13. Read a nonfiction book about technology – The Emperor of All Maladies
  14. Read a book about war – All the Light We Cannot See
  15. Read a YA or middle grade novel by an author who identifies as LGBTQ+ – Boy Meets Boy
  16. Read a book that has been banned or frequently challenged in your country. The Book of Bunny Suicides
  17. Read a classic by an author of color.
  18. Read a superhero comic with a female lead. – Bound Beauty
  19. Read a book in which a character of color goes on a spiritual journey – The Conch Bearer
  20. Read an LGBTQ+ romance novel – Trans-Sister Radio
  21. Read a book published by a micropress – Hot Donut Salad
  22. Read a collection of stories by a woman – Pilgrims
  23. Read a collection of poetry in translation on a theme other than love.
  24. Read a book wherein all point-of-view characters are people of color – The Golden Son

Reading the list, it feels like whoever makes the list are a bit obsessed with the color of the skin and sexual orientation.  I personally read all types of books, and being non-white I read plenty of non-white books anyway, but I don’t like the list is putting emphasis on the skin color of the author, when a well written book is a well written book.

Also, growing up, I have to say I didn’t consider myself as a “person of color.”
I am yellow, there are whites, and blacks, and browns, but white is a color too, isn’t it? Just a different spot on the spectrum of color. They most certainly are not colorless people. Using the term is so divisive, there is “white” and the rest of the world that do not qualify as “white”. It is white supremacy!

For the banned book, I didn’t realize that the banned book list is so extensive in the U.S., that in fact an average reader will actually have to make an effort not to read any. However, I found that The Bunny Suicides book was on one of the list. A bit of googling told me that a mom in Oregon hated this book so much, she tried to get this ban, and planned to burn the book her son checked out, rather than returning it to the school. The school board said they would then be forced to spend money to buy a new copy to review it, and would have to bill the parent, as well as banning her son from borrowing library books as he failed to return titles he checked out.

I also found out that in China they banned the book, because a few students attempted suicide. Now, the students didn’t try to kill rabbits after reading the book, and they suicided by jumping from a building, into the river or taking sleeping pills, not copy-catting any of the unusual ways depicted in the book. It’s a sad fact that students in Asia do get a lot of pressure to perform well in school, and news of suicide is sadly not uncommon. However, I do find the bunnies quite innocent. Therefore, of all the banned books I read, I decide to pick the Bunnies Suicide for my banned book title.

Published in: on January 10, 2017 at 10:23 pm  Leave a Comment